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Nagomi Kitchen is now Nagomi Visit!

2012-10-17

It's an exciting time at Nagomi Visit right now.

We changed our name from Nagomi Kitchen to Nagomi Visit

First, we changed our name from Nagomi Kitchen to Nagomi Visit.

How is that exciting you say? Providing a platform for people to discover real home cooked Japanese food is still very important to us but we wanted to put a bit more of a spotlight on the people that are sharing their yummy food with you when you join a Nagomi Visit because they are the backbone of our program. Good food with good people in the comfort of your "home" in Japan is what we want to provide so changing the name to Nagomi Visit was a no-brainer.

Second, we did a complete overhaul of both our Japanese and English websites.

This is exciting news because we wouldn't have done this unless we were sure that people were interested in our program. We have been humbled by the response we have gotten from both guests participating in our program and the hosts who are welcoming our guests. We just started last year as a program but we are already reaching 150 participants and are very glad to say that interest from both sides is growing!

So we wanted to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of you who have supported us through our first year and glad we are able to welcome more people to our Nagomi family!

Nagomi Kitchen is now in Tokyo and Osaka!

2012-07-14

We are glad to announce that Nagomi Kitchen is expanding into the Kansai region! This means you will be able to visit a host family while you visit any of the major Kansai cities including Kyoto, Nara, or Osaka.

Nagomi Kitchen is now in Tokyo and Osaka

Our first Kansai region host family will be welcoming you to their home in Osaka.

Since we first started Nagomi Kitchen in 2011, we were surprised at the number of people participating in more than one home visits even when we still only had host families in the greater Tokyo area. Now with the Kansai addition, I am hoping people will find that there is even more reason to visit multiple families. Thank you to all our host families. We wouldn't be here without you!

New kyaraben class teacher!

2012-07-12

Two fantastic things happened this Monday. First, we had a very cheery guest from Chile participate in our kyaraben character bento class. With her skilled hands she sure made a yummy bento box bursting with cuteness. I am very serious. Just look at the pictures!

New Nagomi Visit kyaraben class teacher

Second, we now have our friend Yuko as our very cool English and un poquito Spanish speaking kyaraben teacher! A professional of the culinary arts and teaching so we are in very good hands.

New Nagomi Visit kyaraben class teacher

So next time you come and participate in the Nagomi Kitchen kyaraben class we hope you will be excited like these tofu meatballs to meet Yuko and of course learn some Japanese home cooking!

New Nagomi Visit kyaraben class teacher

Note: we no longer conduct Nagomi Kitchen cooking classes but feel free to look for Nagomi Visit hosts who are interested in cooking with you by checking their profile pages. Nagomi Visits are not cooking classes but it will be an enjoyable experience like cooking with a friend.

One busy day of Japanese cooking with 17 participants

2012-05-27

One busy day of Nagomi Visit Japanese cooking with 17 participants

Last Saturday we had 17 participants from Southern Utah University join our cooking program!

One busy day of Nagomi Visit Japanese cooking with 17 participants

The class started when the first 8 arrived in the morning but preparation for the class actually began the day before. We wanted the group to experience as much as possible in the class so we prepared the program so everyone can try making chirashizushi, karaage, tonjiru from the Basic Japanese Cooking class, and the bento from the Kyaraben Japanese Character Lunch Boxes class in less than 3 hours. Of course this includes time to eat and chat!

One busy day of Nagomi Visit Japanese cooking with 17 participants

It was fantastic to see everyone serious about learning but not too serious that they forgot to have some fun, especially with the kyaraben bento boxes.

One busy day of Nagomi Visit Japanese cooking with 17 participants

Although I know some struggled a little trying the Japanese-style mayonnaise and raw fish (which I can totally understand growing up in the States), everyone was quite good about trying everything. I always hope that everyone in our classes give these two ingredients a shot since the mayonnaise is different from what you find in certain countries and hopefully the raw fish is more fresh than what you find in your average Japanese restaurant outside of Japan, but no pressure! It’s just that I used to not be able to eat anything but now I can pretty much everything so I always want to share the joy that comes from giving things a try not just once, but a few more tries. Because you never know what you may end up liking!

The second group of 9 included the wonderful professor himself who was the one responsible for bringing his 14 students to study abroad and participate in our program. What an amazing person! Lots of thanks of course too for thinking that our program will fit well with the student's studies on Japanese family life, culture, food, and nutrition.

One busy day of Nagomi Visit Japanese cooking with 17 participants

Megumi and I are the ones teaching the class of course but because we always teach a diverse group of people, we are also learning from them every time. This time was especially meaningful to me personally because the students were from the US and they reminded me of myself 10 years ago. It was a wonderful feeling being able to share the Japanese side of my Japanese-American identity with them. Hopefully it will have some positive effect!

Last but not least, we must not forget to give recognition to the following two lovely ladies who assisted us for the day.

We must never forget Megumi’s mother who is always helping with the classes. She seems quite popular among our past participants!

One busy day of Nagomi Visit Japanese cooking with 17 participants

And this is our special guest for the day, Megumi’s sister who helped us just for the day. We couldn’t have done it without them!

One busy day of Nagomi Visit Japanese cooking with 17 participants

The small groups of two or three are great but there are many things to learn from these large groups too so hopefully we will get more opportunities like this again!

Note: we no longer conduct Nagomi Visit cooking classes but feel free to look for Nagomi Visit hosts who are interested in cooking with you by checking their profile pages. Nagomi Visits are not cooking classes but it will be an enjoyable experience like cooking with a friend.

Revisiting an old favorite, tofu somen noodles

2012-05-04

Revisiting an old favorite, tofu somen noodles

I think it was 4 years ago when I got hooked on cold tofu somen noodles. It is not a traditional Japanese dish but a product that was probably dreamed up by a company a few years ago and I guess has quite a bit of a fan base since grocery stores still sell it. Since normal cold somen noodles are a summer dish, these somen noodles made out of tofu also usually come out right before we hit the summer season. I use to eat it like a maniac because I loved both tofu and somen so this product seemed like a dream come true. Plus it was low in calories and I was trying to lose pounds and pounds of weight back then so this was perfect and it sure did work.

So now it is right before summer and the tofu somen are displayed nicely on the grocery store shelves. I was reminded of my love for this product and decided to give it another shot. I ate it with green onions, grated ginger, and broth with your basic Japanese ingredients like dashi, soy, and mirin like I would normally eat cold somen noodles. It tasted fine but something felt wrong.

It took me a bit to realize this but I think I’ve started to like the flavor of soy in real tofu so much that not being able to taste the soy enough in the tofu somen just didn’t seem right. So it wasn’t like the tofu somen noodles tasted bad but I think I just had to consider this product more of a new type of somen that happened to be made with tofu than a tofu product.

So I guess my taste buds have changed but I still think tofu somen noodles are a good healthy midnight snack. Much better than the homemade Oreo cheesecake leftovers (or may I say calorie overload?) I ate the other day! Yum but yikes!

Lazy late dinner with takikomi gohan

2012-05-01

Lazy late dinner with takikomi gohan

When I eat my standard Japanese steamed rice at home I usually have my jurokkokumai (十六穀米) which means rice with 16 grains. I have a huge stock of small packets with these 16 grain mixes I get from the supermarket. These individual packets have a long list of grains including foxtail millet, germinated brown rice, black rice, black soybean, amaranthus, sorghum, quinoa, azuki bean, black sesame, white sesame, adlay, red rice, proso millet, barley, corn, and Japanese barnyard millet, and I mixed them into my white rice. Apparently the grains have lots of fiber and is very good for you but I honestly just like it because it tastes good.

However, there are days when I do a little something different. Today my husband felt like takikomi gohan so I made this dashi and soy sauce based rice dish in my rice cooker. All I needed to do was make the base flavor for the rice with soy sauce, mirin (sweet rice wine), dashi stock, and salt, and today's ingredients happen to be chicken thighs, aburaage (deep fried tofu), carrots, shimeji mushrooms, and gobo (burdock) which I cut up into small pieces and placed over the rice to cook.

If you look around for takikomi gohan recipes on the internet, there are ones that use other types of mushrooms, use konnyaku, hijiki sea vegetables, among other ingredients but today I felt like having chicken thighs, aburaage, and gobo for sure so the above was just what I used. I normally like hijiki but if you buy good hijiki the flavor is quite strong so on a day when I wanted to really taste the chicken I decided not to put it in. I also see a few recipes that use sugar or some other sweetener but I usually like a more subtle sweetness so I replaced it with mirin. Lastly it was already past 8PM when I started cooking so I chose a shortcut and used granulated instant dashi instead of making homemade dashi.

When you make this dish, make sure you can find gobo where you live because the earthy taste that comes from this root is very distinct yet nice. Plus preparing it is fun since you use the sasagaki cutting style which literally means to cut something as fine as a bamboo leaf but basically you are cutting the burdock like you are sharpening a pencil with a knife. You can also find instructions on the internet on how to do this so give it a try!

The riddle of the Japanese sausages

2012-04-26

The riddle of the Japanese sausages

I never understood why sausages in Japan are often packaged in 2 separate inflated bags. The really cheap sausages are most of the time just stuffed in one bag probably to keep costs down and the fancier kind which are usually larger or have herbs or other flavorings inside are in vacuum packs. However, for some very odd reason the ones the general consumer usually buys are in 2 bags that are always taped together and sold as a set. Japan is often criticized for its excessive packaging like for their overpriced fruits, but these inflated bags, not only are these balloons a bit annoying when you are trying to place them in your fridge, but the packaging just made no sense.

So I did some research and found out that the bags are inflated because they are filled with nitrogen to prevent food spoilage. The fact that they are in separate bags then allows for double protection against oxygen because most consumers don’t use all the sausages at once. Apparently these bags of nitrogen are slightly better for keeping the juiciness of the meat than the vacuum packs. However, this sort of packaging is probably only possible because the sausages that the average Japanese person eats are small and a bunch can actually fit in a small inflated bag.

Now not only does it makes sense that all the other larger sausages are in vacuum packs, but also the vacuum packed ham and bacon since they will lose their shape if they were placed in these inflated bags.

So I suppose this solves my silly riddle but not the slight headache of having to deal with these balloon like packaging in my fridge?

Cooking lovers must go there

2012-04-25

If you like cooking like me, I think you MUST visit Kappa-bashi(合羽橋)during your stay in Tokyo.

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Kappa-bashi is the street and there are so many shops which provides cooking and kitchen tools such as plates, paper thing, pot, knives, cookie templates, chopstics and so on, I love this place very much!

There is not only for the consumars but also professionals like chef or manager of restaurant it means sometimes you can find and get staffs cheaper than the other place. When I go to Kappa-bashi, usually I need more than three hours to take a look for all the shops I'm interested in because there are tons of nice goods for cooking lovers.

I have thought that I want to introduce this place to all the guest of Nagomi Kitchen, but I have always forgot to take pictures because I always concentlate to my own shopping :D

But few weeks ago, my boyfriend's mother and aunt visited us from Denmark and we took them to Kappa-bashi so finally now I can introduce you my favorite place with many pics!

Many kind of design of tiny plates, it called Mamezara in Japanese. The price is just around 100-300 yen.

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Tea pot, price is about 1,000 yen. You can find many kind of green tea easily at the supermarket and just put them into this pot with hot water.

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Cups, price from 500 yen to 1,000 yen.

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Nambu Ironware, it's the Japanese traditional craft. Looks nice!

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

If you visit Takayama during your trip in Japan, maybe you can find this one at there when you served original dish at Takayama, "Hooba-Miso".

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Steam cooker.

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Kappa-bashi is also famous for the food sample.

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

I will show you something I got at Kappa-bashi.

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Cooking lovers must visit Kappa-bashi

Kappa-bashi is nearby Asakusa (about 10 minutes on foot) so you can schedule to visit this wonderful place at the same day as Asakusa. Good luck for your shopping!

YouTube taught me how to open a sea urchin

2012-04-20

YouTube taught me how to open a sea urchin

A few weeks ago some nice folks gave me fresh uni or sea urchin since they just came from the Tsukiji fish market. This was definitely a very lovely gesture but also very unexpected. Because honestly, the only time I actually cut an uni open was when I found a bunch somewhere in the beaches of Mexico I think. Since coming to Japan I’ve been spoiled with the affordable fresh but already prepared uni in the stores so I just never had to go through the whole preparation process. It would have been great to slice these suckers open on the spot and offer them a piece too but I seriously was not ready.

When I was finally ready for the challenge, I was too excited to wait for any of my kitchen savvy friends to respond to my dilemma that I decided to rely on YouTube. It has saved us from having to pay someone to install our built-in electric cooktop because a video tutorial showed us how to do it ourselves among other things so I thought it was the perfect solution. Sure enough there were a bunch of Japanese (and English which I found afterwards) videos on how to properly scoop out the uni.

Most of the videos tell similar instructions where you either use a knife or some other tool that will help crack open the uni and then you are to pull out the black seaweed that is covering the lovely orange jewels. But the one video I found later on said that you could actually eat that black seaweed separately so will have to try that next time.

YouTube taught me how to open a sea urchin

So the lesson for today is, be like me and use YouTube to solve all your problems! Or at least all your Japanese food related problems because it's sometimes easier to understand than written recipes.

And yes of course, if it weren't for the lovely folks that gave me these uni in the first place, I wouldn't have had this yummy experience. Arigato very much and next time, I will be prepared for sure!

Co-organizer becomes kawarasoba ambassador

2012-04-10

Co-organizer becomes kawarasoba ambassador

I'm usually Alisa Sanada co-organizer for Nagomi Kitchen but last Sunday I was host to a lovely family from Montreal and a very enthusiastic traveler from Moscow. I made kawarasoba which is a dish we always love to make when we have guests visiting Japan.

Co-organizer becomes kawarasoba ambassador

This dish which literally means roof tile soba, is a Shimonoseki specialty. Although Shimonoseki is famous for blowfish worldwide, not many people actually end up visiting the area. Dishes such as takoyaki and okonomiyaki from the Kansai area are quite famous and if visitors have more time they might be exposed to dishes that are famous in Hokkaido or Okinawa, but everything else in between is usually a blur. Making kawarasoba is just my way of introducing at least one of the underrepresented areas in Japan.

Co-organizer becomes kawarasoba ambassador

If you happen to end up trying kawarasoba at a restaurant, this is what it would look like. Of course it looks pretty with the noodles actually on the roof tiles and it sure is good, but like the houtou noodles I ate nabe style a few weeks ago, it's great to eat these regional dishes at someone's home since it makes the dish more accessible. If you eat the kawarasoba with us, you can obviously tell that you can use an electric griddle instead of heating up a roof tile, and use normal buckwheat noodles or udon noodles as a substitute for the green tea noodles since they are sometimes difficult to find.

Try it out at home or come see us when you come to Japan!

Note: Nagomi Kitchen has changed to Nagomi Visit. See more information about our current program on our site.